Superman Rescues Family from Foreclosure

 

 

More than 70 years after Superman first saved the day in the pages of a comic book, the Man of Steel has reached out and saved a family in the real world.


While packing up the home they expected to lose, a family found their hero stashed in the basement, when they came across "Action Comics No. 1"  in their basement. The family struck gold when they discovered the comic book that introduced Superman to the world and brought the superhero to life.


The comic is expected to fetch more than a quater-million dollars when it goes up for auction. In February 2010, a copy of "Action Comic No. 1" sold for $1 million, followed a month later by the sale of another copy in better condition at 1.5 million.

 

by Caroline Ashleigh

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California Man Paid $45 for Garage Sale Find which May Fetch $200 Million

 

July 2010 - A  Fresno, California  construction worker may have made a $200 million find of Ansel Adams* glass negatives, for which he paid only $45 ten years ago, portraying scenes from Yosemite National Park and San Francisco, may now be worth hundreds of millions, if authenticated by appraisers. Continue to follow our blog on the outcome of this story...

 

 

*Photographer Ansel Adams is best known for his striking black-and-white photographs, mainly landscapes, of the American West. He died in 1984 at 82.

by Caroline Ashleigh
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Roy Roger's Trigger Finds a New Home




Ok, so he’s not technically an antique, seeing as he passed away in 1965, however following the July 15 Christie’s auction of Roy Rogers and Dale Evans memorabilia, Rogers’ horse Trigger can be classified as one expensive collectible after selling for $266,500.

First purchased by Rogers on a payment plan for $2,500 back in 1938, Rogers needed to select a horse for the film Under Western Stars. The horse then known as “Golden Cloud,” handled so well it was reported Rogers never looked at another.
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The horse starred in 188 movies and the Roy Rogers Show on NBC from 1951 to 1957. When he died in 1965 of old age, Rogers was reluctant to “put him in the ground” so he had Trigger mounted and put on display at the Roy Rogers-Dale Evans Museum.

The mount was purchased July 15 by Patrick Gottsch, founder and operator of RFD-TV, a nationally-broadcast rural-themed TV network. Gottsch plans to display Trigger at RFD-TV’s corporate headquarters in Omaha.
 
It seems Trigger is a good match for the channel’s television lineup as well. The station will air Roy Rogers movies starting in November with Rogers’ son Dusty and grandson Dustin as hosts of a regular program.

by Antique Trader

Photo Courtesy Christies


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Oscar Gold in Film Collectibles


carolineshoes

There's no place like home - and that's especially true of the warehouse that shelters actress Debbie Reynolds' enormous collection of movie memorabilia, including Dorothy's ruby slippers from "The Wizard of Oz" (shown here). Experts Caroline Ashleigh and Reynolds' son Todd Fisher give "Antiques Roadshow" the grand tour of what's believed to be the largest private accumulation of movie memorabilia in the world -- valued at an astonishing $50 million.


Photo courtesy Antiques Roadshow

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